James Webb Space Telescope detects 'coldest ices measured to date in a molecular cloud' - 4K  VideoFromSpaceView Full coverage on Google News

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Icy grain mantles are the main reservoir of the volatile elements that link chemical processes in dark, interstellar clouds with the formation of planets and the composition of their atmospheres. The initial ice composition is set in the cold, dense parts of molecular clouds, before the onset of star formation. With the exquisite sensitivity of the James Webb Space Telescope, this critical stage of ice evolution is now accessible for detailed study. Here we show initial results of the Early Release Science programme Ice Age that reveal the rich composition of these dense cloud ices. Weak ice features, including 13CO2, OCN−, 13CO, OCS and complex organic molecule functional groups, are now detected along two pre-stellar lines of sight. The 12CO2 ice profile indicates modest growth of the icy grains. Column densities of the major and minor ice species indicate that ices contribute between 2% and 19% of the bulk budgets of the key C, O, N and S elements. Our results suggest that the formation of simple and complex molecules could begin early in a water-ice-rich environment. Using JWST, the molecules seen in planetary atmospheres can be traced back to their cold origins in ices formed in dense interstellar clouds, before the onset of star formation, revealing that chemical diversity and complexity is achieved early.Nature Astronomy - Using JWST, the molecules seen in planetary atmospheres can be traced back to their cold origins in ices formed in dense interstellar clouds, before the onset of star formation,...

An Ice Age JWST inventory of dense molecular cloud ices | Nature Astronomy

An international team of astronomers using NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has obtained an in-depth inventory of the deepest, coldest ices measured to date in a molecular cloud.An international team of astronomers using NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has obtained an in-depth inventory of the deepest, coldest ices measured to date in a molecular cloud.

Webb Unveils Dark Side of Pre-stellar Ice Chemistry | NASA

The ingredients for young stars were spotted about 630 light-years from Earth.The ingredients for young stars were spotted about 630 light-years from Earth.

Webb Finds the ‘Deepest, Coldest Ices to Date’ in Distant Molecular Cloud

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The discovery of diverse ices in the darkest, coldest regions of a molecular cloud measured to date has been announced by an international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. This result allows astronomers to examine the simple icy molecules that will be incorporated into future exoplanets, while opening a new window on the origin of more complex molecules that are the first step in the creation of the building blocks of life.The discovery of diverse ices in the darkest, coldest regions of a molecular cloud measured to date has been announced by an international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. This result allows astronomers to examine the simple icy molecules that will be incorporated into future exoplanets, while opening a new window on the origin of more complex molecules that are the first step in the creation of the building blocks of life.

ESA - Webb unveils dark side of pre-stellar ice chemistry

James Webb snapped a stunning image of the coldest ice ever measure in space, which is also found to feature ethane, sulfur, nitrogen and ethanol - the 'building blocks of life.'James Webb snapped a stunning image of the coldest ice ever measure in space, which is also found to feature ethane, sulfur, nitrogen and ethanol - the 'building blocks of life.'

NASA's James Webb spots 'building blocks of life' frozen in a molecular cloud | Daily Mail Online